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Developing a Love of Reading Babies

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Mem Fox's Ten Read-aloud Commandments Spend at least ten wildly happy minutes every single day reading aloud. Read at least three stories a day – it may be the same story three times. Children need to hear a thousand stories before they can begin to learn to read. Read aloud with animation. Listen to your own voice and don't be dull, or flat, or boring. Hang loose and be loud, have fun and laugh a lot. Read with joy and enjoyment: real enjoyment for yourself and great joy for the listeners. Read the stories that the kids love, over and over and over again, and always read in the same 'tune' for each book: i.e. with the same intonations on each page, each time. Let children hear lots of language by talking to them constantly about the pictures, or anything else connected to the book; or sing any old song that you can remember; or say nursery rhymes in a bouncy way; or be noisy together doing clapping games. Look for rhyme, rhythm or repetition in books for young children, and make sure the books are really short. Play games with the things that you and the child can see on the page, such as letting kids finish rhymes, and finding the letters that start the child's name and yours, remembering that it's never work, it's always a fabulous game. Never ever teach reading, or get tense around books. Read aloud every day because you just love being with your child, not because it's the right thing to do. This is as important for fathers , as it is for mothers! http://www.memfox.com/welcome.html The benefits of introducing your baby to books are huge! Time to interact with baby (particularly for grandparents or dads who may not intuitively know what to “say”) Soothing stories help with relaxation and bonding Helps establish language patterns before speech develops Establishes the link between the written word and sound- connections for later literacy skills By hearing words over and over building up a good bank for language Establishes a routine and an understanding that reading is of value! Establishes a routine as they get older eg tea, bath, book, bed. tberrysquare online australian http://www.a-in-a-circle.com/bun.html Introduces concepts such as numbers, letters, colors, and shapes in a fun way Gives babies information about the world around them How do you read to a baby? For very young babies simply find a comfortable chair, cradle your baby amp; read the book. Look for picture books that are bright and colourful Talk about the pictures with your little one (even make up a story) Sing the text to keep baby's attention. Read beautiful books to your baby that have rhythmical language. Babies love — and learn from — repetition, so don't be afraid of reading the same books over and over. When you do so, repeat the same emphasis each time as you would with a familiar song. Some examples: Possum Magic, Wombat Stew, Hairy Maclary, Good Night Moon, Boo to a Goose As the baby gets older and can start to grab for the book.. Add some small, chunky board books that your baby can easily hold onto and “read themselves” Play peek-a-boo with lift-the-flap books, mirrors etc Help your baby touch and feel in texture books Talk...

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How Does your Child Play?

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

intechres online australian http://www.a-in-a-circle.com/design.html How Does your Child Play? By Pinky McKay Unless you already have more than one child, you will be your child’s first playmate (and teacher) and even if you have several children, unless there is an age gap of a few years, playing together peaceably without supervision will be a challenge for a while yet. While toddlers love the company of other children and playgroups are fun (especially for parents who need reassurance that their child’s spirited behaviour is actually ‘on track’!), the ability to share toys and play co-operatively will take time and depends on stages of maturity. One year olds usually wander around by themselves, exploring and occasionally taking a toy from another child or imitating their actions, but generally they don’t really play together with other children. This kind of play is called ‘solitary play’ by the experts. Later, little ones begin to engage in ‘parallel play’ which means that two children may play alongside each other but without much interaction – they might both play with cars or build with blocks but they will be playing separately. Then, when they are closer to three years old, toddlers begin to play co-operatively perhaps building a road together in the sandpit or making a block tower together. However, sharing treasured toys and attention (especially their parents) can take a while yet. So please don’t give up on playgroups or play dates because it seems like a waste of time – despite his developmental stage right now, with your support, your child will gradually learn to get along with other children and adults, he will enjoy meeting people in a familiar setting and by making this commitment, you are sowing seeds of later social skills such as sharing, empathy, fairness and self control. For more top tips about toddler play and learning, see Toddler Tactics by Pinky McKay (Penguin) or visit Pinky’s website...

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Sense of Smell

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Sense of Smell Smell is the most advanced, out of the five senses, present in babies at the time of birth. Taste and smell are chemical senses; they process information by processing chemical changes in the air and in objects on the tongue. These are primitive sensory systems that are intimately involved with early developmental activities such as feeding, eating, and recognizing family members compared to strangers. In this way, these are protective senses Infants during the first week, primarily differentiate between two things and people, using their sense of smell. They pick up on the new odours and associate these smells to certain things or people. Babies use their sense of smell mostly to stay close to their mother – it is advisable not to wear perfume in the early months for this reason. The sweet scent of lavender or aroma of a cake being baked actually makes a child happier. victoryag.org tberrysquare online Smelling Sense in a Baby Using their sense of smell, babies can differentiate between their mother’s breast milk from that of other mothers. A 3 or 4 day old infant recognizes the smell of his/her mother’s breast milk. Just the smell of it makes them happy and contended. Infants are seen to smile at the odors, which are similar to bananas and vanilla. Studies show that infants select and play with a vanilla scented toy more frequently, than with toys that are ethanol-scented or unscented. Infants prefer the smell of a lactating woman over a non-lactating woman. As sense of smell develops in a baby, he/she can associate good smells and aromas with good feelings. Soft fragrance used in a massage can soothe and delight the baby. And they will relate that smell- eg lavender An infant’s sense of smell develops as he/she grow bigger. He/she can distinguish different smells easily. By the age of one, most babies can recognize the smells of other adults and children. They are also able to differentiate the smells of different foods and associate smell with...

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School Readiness is About Being Ready to Learn

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

School Readiness is About Being Ready to Learn Talk to any kindergarten teacher and they will tell you that in the first week of a kindergarten classroom, they can quickly tell you which children are going to thrive and learn in the school environment, and those that will struggle. Why is it that some children arrive at school, thirsty for knowledge and the challenges of the classroom and others begin to fall down, lost in the formalities and structure of school. Sadly, after the excitement of big school wears off, by mid term one, they no longer want to be there, quickly realizing that they are not able to do what many of their friends can do easily Then for the parents, begins the interviews with teachers, looking for answers as to why their child is not learning – for many parents this continues for the child’s school career. So then, how to avoid this scenario? The answer is not to hot house children! School readiness is not about being able to read or count to 100! Success in kindergarten is being about ready to learn! To sit still in a chair with good posture and balance so the eyes can focus. To have good fine motor control so that you can hold a pencil to write. To have good spatial awareness so they can do maths and music. To have good balance, so that the eyes and ears work well. So, how do you get your 4 or 5 year old ready for school? Let them experience lots of varied play activities to develop all areas of their physical body, which in turn will help to develop their motor planning and thinking skills. Swings and activities that encourage balance and the vestibular system pittsburgpa online http://www.a-in-a-circle.com/newton/bic.html aussie Monkey bars, climbing and weight bearing activities to help to develop the upper body. Good upper body strength is needed for later handwriting development Complex fine motor activities- puzzles, craft , toys that encourage a range of movement in fingers to develop dexterity or handwriting Scooter and bikes to encourage balance. Balance is linked closely to eye development and tracking needed for reading. Motor planning activities to develop body awareness Singing, music and nursery rhymes to develop sequencing and memory skills for comprehension amp; phonemic awareness when reading Reading to your child. Sharing and discussing books. Don’t try to teach or force them to read the print until they are ready. Talk about words in their environment eg signs at the shop, numbers etc. They will begin to recognise words and symbols long before they isolate sounds and letters. How many children could recognise their favourite fast food sign in print? Dress up opportunities for fantasy play. This helps with imagination, social development and body awareness as they manipulate buttons etc Sand and water play helps the child to learn about their environment and many maths skills as they measure and pour. Look at their diet- are you feeding their brain or bad behaviour? Letting children eat food that have no nutritional value amp; are full of chemicals is going to hinder good development. Become aware of what you are feeding your child and gradually bring about some changes Play is the essential ingredient for success at school. There is plenty...

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Hello world!

Posted by on Mar 26, 2014 in Uncategorized | 1 comment

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

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